About

picture of navasola
A view of the house November 2013

Trevor and Georgina bought the finca Navasola in 2005. The old part of the house is still visible in the picture. With low ceilings and a very draughty roof it was very cold and gloomy through the winter months.  After many years of going through the planning procedures needed for a Casa Rural, country guest house, we have gone ahead with just renovating the old house.

The land around the house is part of a U shaped valley and has many old chestnut trees, olives, oaks and pines. It is rich in biodiversity and in 2006 we had nature survey compiled by Theresa Farino and Trevor Bending. In 2007 and 2008 we organised two courses about the flora and fauna of the Sierra Aracena. These were very helpful in enhancing my knowledge about the range of birds and wild flowers in this part of Southern Spain. I was mainly organising the food at the time but I kept my ears open! Since then I have become more interested in learning more about the amazing variety of life in our local areas.  I have become a member of local wildlife trusts in the London area and very much enjoyed being involved with activities in Minet Country Park; a flagship achievement of the organisation Arocha and the local council.

In 2013 I finally made the decision to retire from my teaching career and embark on this new journey. I have been learning Spanish for some years but will still struggle to produce a coherent and grammatical sentence. My first experiences with the Spanish language were based on using the BBC’s Get By In Spanish. This worked quite well but I felt I needed more for my long awaited trip to Peru. I now need a lot more but hope that practice will make for slightly easier communication on all sides!

From the spiritual angle I am a long term practitioner of Transcendental Meditation and have always been interested in the scientific validation of meditation as well as the spiritual development regular practice supports. I have always been interested in different traditions and spiritual practices. At present I am very interested in the Quaker approach to life and spirituality.

I have spent time in India and learnt some Hindi and Sanskrit. It was also one of the most important experiences of living within another culture for me. I have also had an interest in Tai Chi , acupuncture and reflexology.

I hope my life living at the finca Navasola will help me continue these interests and to develop my creativity with more writing and art work. I also hope that by sharing aspects of this others too might find support and encouragement in moving towards a more sustainable and peaceful world.

Advertisements

33 thoughts on “About”

  1. I greatly admire your goals and lifestyle. Just last week, I reduced my thirty year counseling job to one day per week and will continue to teach meditation in my Stress Management group to stay mindful do those skills. Now I have more time for writing and art work, like you. I appreciate your visit and comment on “Anything is Pissible!”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good luck in your new endeavours and personally I think it will be good for you creatively and spiritually. Some jobs are very rewarding but do take their toll on the creative life.

      Like

  2. Gorgeous About-me-page. I always rear About-pages, in many cases they present themselves in an interesting way, their life, hobbies, countries etc.

    II find that in South America they speak Spanish, which is easier to understand than Spanish in Spain – my opinion.

    Did You know that 100 is in Finnish sata and in Sanskrit also sata.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. This copied from Wikipedia: “Finnish is a member of the Finnic group of Finnish is a member of the Finnic group of the Uralic family of languages. The Finnic group also includes Estonian and a few minority languages spoken around the Baltic Sea.

        This is what “wise men” say. Finnish is one of the most difficult language in the world. When learning many languages, I have noticed that there are single similarities even in French and Finnish. Man must listen how words are pronounced, not written. An example is French word Avirons (in English oars), in Finnish Airot. It is natural that oars is very old word and it existed since centuries or even more long time. In Portuguese there are also some nearly same way written words meaning the same.

        In my company, many years ago, there was a man who studied similarities between Quechua and Finnish. He found, if I remember correct, about 100 similarities and many of those words were derived from the language used in the Stone Age, in other words housing, hunting, fishing and family.

        Languages are interesting!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. The history of languages and their connections is fascinating. True linguists like to know many languages and make comparisons. You certainly have a love for the amazing range of tongues we humans speak.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Nature needs Nurture

%d bloggers like this: